Astro, a non-binary person in animal costume, with arms up and extended wearing an a11y shirt.

Image Description: Astro, a non-binary person in animal costume, with arms up and extended wearing an a11y shirt.

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Announcing the Launch of Salesforce’s Accessibility Site

Salesforce, the global leader in CRM, announced the launch of its public-facing accessibility website, which details Salesforce’s work internally and with the broader community to achieve full equality for people with disabilities.

Nov 09, 2021

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 9, 2021 — Salesforce, the global leader in CRM (NYSE: CRM), announced the launch of its public-facing accessibility website, which details Salesforce’s work internally and with the broader community to achieve full equality for people with disabilities.

"We’ve been developing this site for the better part of a year,” said Thomas Frantz, senior manager of Accessibility Partnerships and Public Relations at Salesforce. “As a person with a disability myself, I’m thrilled to be able to share with the public more information about our accessibility efforts at Salesforce and within the global community.”

A core theme throughout the accessibility site is the concept of “a11y” (pronounced “A-eleven-Y”).

This is a globally recognized abbreviation for "accessibility," originally shortened for social media character limits. In recent years, a11y has gained momentum outside of the technical realm to represent the broader accessibility and diversity inclusion movement.

In addition to highlighting Salesforce’s ongoing work to provide equal opportunities to employees with disabilities, the accessibility site provides educational content on the importance of accessibility, relevant resources, and highlights programs available to the public, as well as a feedback form.

Another exciting feature is its representation of the disability community through Salesforce’s signature characters.

The accessibility team worked closely with Salesforce’s brand team and members of the disability community to create illustrations that visually conveyed the messaging of the site itself.

“The journey to equality, inclusion, and true belonging for people with disabilities is a long road, and we openly recognize there is much more work to be done,” Frantz said. “But we hope this new site represents an important move forward in providing people with disabilities access to the same opportunities and experiences. The more we can create a truly inclusive culture, the stronger we become as a company and community.”

Check out the accessibility site for yourself at salesforce.com/accessibility, and please be sure to leave any recommendations or feedback by selecting “View the Form” on the “Feedback and Resources” page!

Written by Thomas Frantz

He/Him. Thomas Frantz is the Senior Manager of Accessibility Partnerships and PR at Salesforce.

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